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Harvard’s Ash Institute for Democratic Governance and Innovation has named UT Austin’s UTeach Natural Sciences program one of the Top 50 Innovations in American Government. UTeach prevailed among some 600 applicants. Six of the 50 finalists will be honored with an Innovations in American Government Award. UTeach, a program to train K–12 math and science teachers, is recognized for the increased size of its graduating class (now up to 70 annually); a superior record of teacher performance and retention (80 percent of its graduates are still teaching after five years, 10 percent higher than the national average); and the national growth of replica programs (13 colleges and universities have received grants to start their own curricula patterned after UTeach).

Using modern learning theories and considerable hands-on classroom experience, UTeach prepares college math and science majors to become K–12 teachers as they themselves are advancing their own math and science educations. In The Best & the Brightest, UTeach creator Dr. Mary Ann Rankin, dean of the College of Natural Sciences at UT Austin, and Austin middle school science teacher and UTeach graduate Elizabeth Abernathy explain the origins of UTeach and how the program works.

If you’ve watched State of Tomorrow™, you already know higher education means more than an advanced degree. It means groundbreaking cancer treatments, new sources of energy to power our world, educational programs that help our next generation and research that keeps us safe today and tomorrow.

It also means people. In fact, that’s what makes State of Tomorrow so powerful — the people we meet in the lab, in the classroom or in the field. We hear their stories — and stories from people whose lives are forever changed by university faculty and researchers.

In 21st Century Cancer Care, Dr. James Cox tells us “Academic environments lead to creativity. They put an emphasis on bringing new things to patients — to science in general. We can push the envelope and each other to succeed in ways that haven’t been done before.”

‘Ways that haven’t been done before.’ That is the heart of innovation — to rethink, to improve, to imagine. That’s exactly what we’ve tried to do on this new State of Tomorrow site. We’ve added videos that allow you to dig deeper into topics. We’ve caught up with scientists and researchers from the series and highlighted their progress with in-depth features. We’ve made sure everyone can watch the series online. And, we’ve made sure every educator has access to the State of Tomorrow teaching tools.

Our main goal, after all, is to get the word out about public higher education. So that every time you think about healthcare or environmental quality or national security, you think about higher education — and every time you think about higher ed, you think about people who are working to make our communities stronger, safer, healthier and prosperous.