In an article concerning the shortage of nurses in Texas, The Monitor in McAllen quotes the chairman of the Texas Nursing Workforce Shortage Coalition and the president and chief executive officer of the Texas Hospital Association, Dan Stultz:

“Demand for full-time registered nurses in Texas in 2008 exceeded supply by 22,000 and, without major increases in funding for nurse education, this gap will widen to 70,000 by 2020 as the state’s rapidly growing population ages and as older nurses retire or reduce the hours they work.”

The quality of our hospitals and healthcare depends on the quality — and quantity — of our healthcare workforce. Shortage of Nurses follows nursing students at two innovative programs designed to accelerate graduation and address the critical need for more healthcare professionals in our state.

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Recently, according to the San Antonio Business Journal, University of Texas at San Antonio’s dean of the College of the Sciences George Perry has been named one of the world’s top 10 Alzheimer’s researchers.

In Aging with Dignity, researchers take us into some of higher education’s most innovative laboratories, where scientists and clinicians are tracking the intricacies of aging bodies and minds. Can we slow the crippling disabilities of age? Cure or better manage the cruel losses of Alzheimer’s and other dementias? Patients and family members with little time and lingering hopes talk about a future facing a huge generation of baby boomers and those who will care for them.

In this interview, Dr. Roger Rosenberg discusses his research at UT Southwestern Medical School in Dallas and how they hope to slow the aging process long enough to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

With President Obama’s lift of the restrictions on federal funding for research with embryonic stem-cells, there have been many headlines concerning stem-cell research on a national level, but what is going on here in Texas?

In Rebuilding the Heart, James T. Willerson, M.D. and Emerson C. Perin, M.D. share the story of stem cell research occurring at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston that hopes to design a cure for failing hearts. By using 3D mapping and adult stem-cells, these Texas researchers are making a new path to cure heart disease.

“When one has a heart attack, a blood clot forms in a specific artery in the heart obstructing it, depriving a region of the heart of blood flow and that part of the heart dies. And with repeated heart attacks, the heart enlarges and becomes basketball shaped and rather than contracting vigorously, it may just quiver at the top. When that occurs, the patient has no energy, cannot walk any distance without becoming very short of breath, and about half of them are dead in 3 to 4 years,” Willerson explains. “Within 2 months, some who could not walk 20 feet without getting short of breath previously were now jogging on the beach.”

Travel around Texas with State of Tomorrow™ and meet higher education researchers working hard for your, well, tomorrow. They’re striving to improve our future with groundbreaking research in such areas as treatment of cancer and of emerging infectious diseases; training better math and science teachers; maximizing available energy resources while searching for viable alternatives; and expanding our understanding of genomes (DNA) so we can live longer.

Meet Ritsuko Komaki and James D. Cox, who were instrumental in bringing the Proton Therapy Center to UT M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Proton therapy — which has been described as more like a form of surgery than a form of radiation — is the most precise cancer treatment available, with the fewest side effects, making it a primary cancer-fighter of the future.

Explore the ultra-secure Galveston National Laboratory and the Robert E. Shope, M.D. Laboratory at UT Medical Branch – Galveston, where C. J. Peters leads a team of scientists studying the most exotic, dangerous and contagious viral diseases known to man. They’re looking for vaccines and cures for the likes of Rift Valley fever, SARS and the Marburg virus — both to protect people around the world from the diseases in their natural form and to defend against their possible use as bioterrorist weapons of mass destruction.

Hear why Dr. Scott W. Tinker, director of the UT Austin Bureau of Economic Geology, asserts that so-called “energy independence” is unattainable in a world where nations are growing more, not less, interdependent. But with the proper planning, preparation and compromising, “energy security,” a much more reasonable goal, is well within our reach.

Listen to an extended interview with Dr. Steven Austad, professor of cellular and structural biology at the UT Health Science Center – San Antonio, about what he’s doing to extend the lives of humans.

Learn why UTeach at UT Austin has become a national model for training more effective math, science and computer science teachers who, in turn, will attract more students to these crucial fields.

And see how students at the UT Health Science Center – Houston “practice medicine” on complex, computer-driven human patient simulators.

Together, these men and women help assure a better future for us all.

If you’ve watched State of Tomorrow™, you already know higher education means more than an advanced degree. It means groundbreaking cancer treatments, new sources of energy to power our world, educational programs that help our next generation and research that keeps us safe today and tomorrow.

It also means people. In fact, that’s what makes State of Tomorrow so powerful — the people we meet in the lab, in the classroom or in the field. We hear their stories — and stories from people whose lives are forever changed by university faculty and researchers.

In 21st Century Cancer Care, Dr. James Cox tells us “Academic environments lead to creativity. They put an emphasis on bringing new things to patients — to science in general. We can push the envelope and each other to succeed in ways that haven’t been done before.”

‘Ways that haven’t been done before.’ That is the heart of innovation — to rethink, to improve, to imagine. That’s exactly what we’ve tried to do on this new State of Tomorrow site. We’ve added videos that allow you to dig deeper into topics. We’ve caught up with scientists and researchers from the series and highlighted their progress with in-depth features. We’ve made sure everyone can watch the series online. And, we’ve made sure every educator has access to the State of Tomorrow teaching tools.

Our main goal, after all, is to get the word out about public higher education. So that every time you think about healthcare or environmental quality or national security, you think about higher education — and every time you think about higher ed, you think about people who are working to make our communities stronger, safer, healthier and prosperous.